Visualization of schistosomiasis snail habitats using light unmanned aerial vehicles

  • Andrew J. Chamberlin | andy.chamberlin@gmail.com Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA, United States.
  • Isabel J. Jones Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA, United States.
  • Andrea J. Lund Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States.
  • Nicolas Jouanard Biomedical Research Center EPLS, Saint Louis; Station d'Innovation Aquacole, Saint Louis, Senegal.
  • Gilles Riveau Biomedical Research Center EPLS, Saint Louis, Senegal.
  • Raphaël Ndione Biomedical Research Center EPLS, Saint Louis, Senegal.
  • Susanne H. Sokolow Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA, United States.
  • Chelsea L. Wood School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States.
  • Kevin D. Lafferty Western Ecological Research Center, United States Geological Survey; Marine Science Institute, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA, United States.
  • Giulio A. De Leo Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA, USA, United States.

Abstract

Schistosomiasis, or “snail fever”, is a parasitic disease affecting over 200 million people worldwide. People become infected when exposed to water containing particular species of freshwater snails. Habitats for such snails can be mapped using lightweight, inexpensive and field-deployable consumer-grade Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), also known as drones. Drones can obtain imagery in remote areas with poor satellite imagery. An unexpected outcome of using drones is public engagement. Whereas sampling snails exposes field technicians to infection risk and might disturb locals who are also using the water site, drones are novel and fun to watch, attracting crowds that can be educated about the infection risk.

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References

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Published
2021-01-08
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Section
vHealth Communications
Keywords:
Drones, health assessment, risk-mapping, schistosomiasis, Senegal, spatio-temporal visualization.
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How to Cite
Chamberlin, A. J., Jones, I. J., Lund, A. J., Jouanard, N., Riveau, G., Ndione, R., Sokolow, S. H., Wood, C. L., Lafferty, K. D., & De Leo, G. A. (2021). Visualization of schistosomiasis snail habitats using light unmanned aerial vehicles. Geospatial Health, 15(2). https://doi.org/10.4081/gh.2020.818