Report-back for geo-referenced environmental data: A case study on personal monitoring of temperature in outdoor workers

  • Laura Thompson | thompsonlk1@appstate.edu Department of Geography and Planning, Appalachian State University, Boone, North Carolina, United States.
  • Maggie Sugg Department of Geography and Planning, Appalachian State University, Boone, North Carolina, United States.
  • Jennifer Runkle North Carolina Institute for Climate Studies, North Carolina State University, Asheville, North Carolina, United States.

Abstract

Few studies have evaluated the benefits of reporting back participatory environmental monitoring results, particularly regarding participant motivation toward behavioural modification concerning workplace heat exposure. This study evaluated the individual data report-back for geo-located environmental temperature and time activity patterns in grounds maintenance crews in three geographic regions across the South-eastern United States. Surveys collected information on worker interpretation of their results and intended action(s) to reduce heat exposure. Worker response was highly positive, especially among more experienced workers who expressed a greater willingness to modify personal behaviour to reduce heat stress. Individual-level report-back of environmental data is a powerful tool for individuals to understand and act on their personal exposure to heat.

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Published
2018-05-07
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Issue
Section
Original Articles
Keywords:
Citizen science, Environmental health literacy, Participatory environmental monitoring, Occupational heat exposure, Data report-back.
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How to Cite
Thompson, L., Sugg, M., & Runkle, J. (2018). Report-back for geo-referenced environmental data: A case study on personal monitoring of temperature in outdoor workers. Geospatial Health, 13(1). https://doi.org/10.4081/gh.2018.629